Finding Your British Roots

Notes from presentation at Grande Prairie, 13 Sept 2014:

Some Key Dates and Events:

  • 1536 Henry VIII separates from the Catholic Church and forms Church of England
  • 1536 to 1541 First English conquest of Ireland
  • 1538 Churches told to keep records of Births, Marriages, and Deaths (BMD) – early records may be on scraps of paper!
  • 1598  Churches told to make copies of parish records and send to Bishop – Bishop’s Transcripts – very valuable back up of parish records
  • 1603 – King of Scotland became king of England
  • 1643 – 1647 Civil War – some records damaged or destroyed
  • 1752 calendar changed in England – moved start of New Year to Jan 1 from March 25 (Lady’s Day) – 11 days omitted from calendar in 1752 (2 Sep followed by 14 Sep)
  • 1754 Marriages to be kept in separate register
  • 1812 – new forms issued for parish records
  • 1834 Poor Law Unions created – groups of parishes care for poor – prior to that check each parish for poor law records

(1837/1841 is a pivotal period of change!)

  • 1 Jul 1837 – state registration of BMD begins – beware of first few months and years! – no penalty for not registering a birth until 1875 – quarterly indexes
  • 1841 – first national census that gives names and more – but use with caution – ages may be rounded off to nearest five – and doesn’t give same information as 1851 and subsequent census
  • 1858The Principal Probate Registry, a civil government system, replaced church courts
  • 19thC – need to start to watch for non conformist records
  • 1911 – latest census available for research
  • 1922 -Republic of Ireland gains independence – leaving 6 counties in Northern Ireland still in United Kingdom

Basic vocabulary about places

1. Government Jurisdictions:

Country – A nation or state – England is a country, so is Scotland – so is the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

County – some are called Shire – land division within the country – 40 counties in England

District – a unit of area created for civil registration, may be a number of parishes – or even cross county boundaries

Parish – smallest unit of civil administration also known as a township; it may include part or one or several ecclesiastical parishes

Village, Town or Hamlet – A small locality within a parish

2. Ecclesiastical Jurisdictions:

Province – A large area over which an archbishop has authority and consists of a number of dioceses – there are 2 in England

Diocese – An area or district over which a bishop has authority and consists of one or more archdeaconries (with their rural deaneries and parishes); the seat of power or authority of a bishop

Archdeaconry – An area consisting of a number of rural deaneries (with their parishes), headed by an archdeacon

Rural Deanery – An area consisting of a number of ecclesiastical parishes, headed by a rural dean (usually one of the parish ministers within the deanery)

Parish – A district served by a clergyman (a Vicar or Rector) of the Church of England – at least one church  - often the center of community life.

Chapelry – A congregation with its own church within a parish and supervised by the parish – usually created from a rise in population or convenience in distance.

Follow the Research Process – five main steps:

1. Begin by identifying what you know and also what you do not know. Do this by gathering records, photographs, and artifacts from your home and other places. And then make a list.

2. Decide what you want to learn, write down all your thoughts, and then formulate a specific research goal.

3. Learn what sources are available to help you accomplish your goal.

4. Explore these resources to gather more family information.

5. Evaluate the information you have gleaned, and add it to your records. And finally, make sure that you share your findings with others.

Organize what you know

Useful tools for this are:

  1. Pedigree Chart – with space for four or five generations (parents, grandparents and great grandparents).
  2. Family Group Record – space to record information about parents and children in one family.
  3. Computer program – we strongly recommend everyone select one – lots of great programs available – many of them have free versions so you can try before you buy!  Try RootsMagic, or Legacy Family Tree or Ancestral Quest or FamilyTree Maker or Mac Family Tree or  . . .  many others.  You select the “car” you drive.

Keys:  know the place – know the jurisdiction names – know the record type availability – know where to look and how to search!

1.  Know the major record types, dates when they are available and where you can access them

Four major record types:

Civil Registration – started  1 July 1837 – official index at findmypast.com – BMD 1837-1920 at familysearch.org – FreeBMD.org.uk another source.

Order BMD certificates online – use government website – except Scotland use Scotlandspeople.gov.uk.  For Ireland read the wiki article on Ireland – look for the section on Civil Registration.

Census – findmypast or ancestry.com or familysearch.org – get to the images – 1841 and then every 10 years – this is the easiest to access (unless you are working in Ireland!) and should be searched exhaustively – make sure you see the images – and save them to attach to Sources.

Church Records – search by parish – so need to know your parish – look for Parish records or Bishop’s Transcripts

Wills and Probate – can provide very helpful information – date of death and location determine where you look

Hint: Learn to use the wiki at FamilySearch.org!!!! Learn to use the wiki at FamilySearch.org!!!!

Country ____________

Type of Record

Years Available

Location for Access

BMD (govt) aka Civil Registration aka Vital Records

Census

(govt)

Church Records

aka Parish  Records or Bishop’s Transcripts

Wills and Probate

Use FamilySearch Wiki to find information.  If not found on wiki then use learning centre at ancestry.com or a gateway site (listing of sites by topics) such as Mary’s Treasures or Cyndi’s List

2. Know the Location – is the place a parish?  if not what parish is it in?  is it a chapelry within a parish?  what other jurisdictions is the place in?

Use Gazetteers such as visionofbritain.org.uk (usually get Wilson’s Imperial Gazetteer) or genuki.org.uk – go to Church Database or use the FamilySearch wiki

Use the FH Catalog at familySearch.org

For England use maps.familysearch.org – also gives dates for records in a parish and other jurisdiction names

Both maps.familysearch and the GENUKI church database allow you to see adjoining and nearby parishes

Phillimore’s “Great Britain, Atlas and Index to Parish Registers” now digitized on Ancestry.co.uk – covers England, Scotland and Wales – lacking grid codes on margin of pages

Jurisdiction names – where else might you look?  - find the county, civil registration district, poor law union, diocese, province – see maps.familysearch.org for England.

Try http://www.old-maps.co.uk – ignore sign in and prices – click on Get Maps and then fill in Search box

Ireland has unique jurisdiction names like townlands

3. Know how to search – understand how to access extracted records as a help

At familysearch.org you can now search in Historical Records (click on Search and select Records) by just:

  • place name – if you are not sure of the spelling look it up in the Catalog
  • surname – resist exact searches
  • film number – look this up in the Catalog
  • batch number – see below for how to find

Very powerful when you search first by place or film and then add Surname

Approximately 80% of English parishes have been filmed and records extracted that are available in Records at FamilySearch.  What years were extracted for your parish (if any!)?  What types of records?  Christening/baptism?  or Marriage? or both?

Do a google search for: wallis igi   (use long url including word rootsweb) – has index by country in British Isles, then county then parish – gives dates of extractions – can copy batch numbers to paste in FamilySearch.  Alternatively check http://www.archersoftware.co.uk/igi/ – newer and refers to Wallis

Only 5% of the archives have been digitized, but that number is increasing . . .  so try the National Archives http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/

Ancestry.com and FindMyPast.co.uk (both available for free at your FH Centre) have British records including some parish information – but limited Scottish.  Both have extensive census images and indexes.

For Scotland you will also want to use scotlandspeople.gov.uk – for which you will have to pay – so get all you can from the other sites.

For Ireland – there are several good websites including eneclann.ie – there is a good list in the article on Ireland at the FamilySearch wiki

Google searches may show sites to access transcriptions and occasionally images from  church records – worth a search.  Look for the online parish clerk project (OPC) – done by volunteers – usefulness varies.  Consider using specialized search sites like genealogyintime.com which has a free genealogy search engine.

4. Why you might still use a microfilm?

Even if the record has been extracted you only seeing someone’s opinion of what the record said.  If possible it is best to see the original yourself.

Also the original record may give you some additional information such as occupation of the father or place where they lived in the parish. 

Burials are rarely extracted on FamilySearch and may give you the age at death or simply Infant and sometimes a parent’s name.

How to access the microfilm?  Use the catalog at familysearch.org to find if the film is available for your parish. Then go to films.familysearch.org to order – the cost covers shipping and handling.  You will need to go to a FH Centre to view the film.

5.  Summary on resources for British Research:

  • Historical records at FamilySearch.org – remember records are being added almost each week – keep checking back
  • Research wiki – go to search link at FamilySearch.org – England page includes how to do research- similar pages for Wales, Scotland and Ireland
  • ancestry.com – learning centre free from home without subscription
  • Findmypast.co.uk – available for free at your local FH Centre – official BMD indexes, national burial index, parish records, military records – and Irish records
  • Online courses at FamilySearch.org – go to Get Help and then Learning Center – e.g. England Beginning Research parts 1,2, 3

pfhn.wordpress.com – our blog

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Getting Started – or Re-started – With Your Family History – Sept 2014 Version

How do you get started? – 5 steps

  1. Identify known family information – write what you know – fill in as much of a pedigree chart as you can – check with relatives – has anyone done research on your family?  (see Types of Websites in Section 2 below)
  2. Decide what you want to learn – look at your pedigree chart – set a research objective.
  3. Select records to search – what types of records are available for your locality in the time period you are searching? (check on the research wiki to find out about records that are available) – where can you access them?
  4. Obtain and search the records – keep a record of your findings in a research log
  5. Evaluate and use the information – is this my ancestor? Record the information. Share what you have found.
  6. Do more research or set a new goal.

Go to a Family History Centre and get a copy of “How Do I Start My Family History” (includes a blank pedigree chart) – and get personal help! – you can also look in the Research Wiki at  http://familysearch.org (from the main page click on Search and then click on Wiki) – the same website has 100s of free research courses (from main page click on Get Help in upper right and then Learning Center).

Tip #1 Is this my ancestor?  Consider the following:

  1. Is the possible match person living in the right place to be my ancestor?
  2. Is this event in the right time period to be within the lifetime of my ancestor?
  3. Is the possible match person too young or too old to have been my ancestor?
  4. Are names of children associated with the possible match consistent with what I already know about the children of my ancestor?
  5. Do the ages of the children seem logical, or are they too young or too old to be my ancestor’s children?
  6. Is this the right spouse?
  7. Are the economic conditions of this person consistent with the known family history?
  8. Do the relatives and associates of your ancestor appear in records with the possible match?
  9. Is the possible match person affiliated with the church you know your ancestor belonged to?
  10. Could the possible match person, living in a neighboring county, be my ancestor?  County and electoral district boundaries changed over the years.
  11. Why is the name of the possible match person spelled differently from my ancestor’s name? The name of a person was commonly spelled differently in different documents.

Tip #2 Make a decision about your possible match – choices:

  1. Confirm the person as your ancestor.
  2. Suspect that the person may be a relative with the same name.
  3. Eliminate that person as your possible ancestor.
  4. Decide that there is not enough information yet to confirm or eliminate this person as your ancestor.

(From “How to Recognize your Canadian Ancestor” in  the research wiki at FamilySearch.org)

Tip #3 Select a genealogy software program to record, and organize your research – & print reports. There are even several very good free programs available – Rootsmagic, Ancestral Quest, Legacy FamilyTree have free versions – there are many many choices – FamilyTreeMaker, Reunion and so on.  Take a test drive before deciding – matter of personal choice!  Do not select your software based on the number of “free” names given to you, and don’t use price as a criterion!  Think: is the person giving me the advice also the person selling the software?

Using the Internet for Family History – tips and strategies:

  • The Internet is a wonderful tool with which to do family history.
  • There are some very good sites and some not as good, so be selective
  • Just like printed materials, being on the Internet does NOT mean it is true!  VERIFY any information you obtain from the Internet unless it is from a scanned copy of an original record.
  • Remember that indexes, and typed copies of originals are secondary sources
  • Unless it is a scanned copy of an original document it is not a primary source
  • You always need to look at the original whenever possible
  • You can’t do all your research on the Internet (yet!), so recognize that you will need to use a library and archives at some point
  • Use “Find on this page” (Ctrl + F), found under the “Edit” to search for a specific word, such as a surname or place, on a web page
  • Keep a list of the addresses of web sites you have visited, along with what you found there – the Internet is very changeable, what is there today may not be there tomorrow – consider how you can save the information you find (Hint: take a screen shot)
  • Be aware of spelling variations and nicknames – e.g’s James may be Jas, William may be Bill or Will or Wm.  Just because you know how the name is correctly spelled does not mean the person who wrote or transcribed the record will have it right!  Try to work out how it was written in the record.  Could a birth in Middlesex be transcribed Mexico?  Could Bethnal Green become Green Bethnal?  Be careful in the use of Mc or Mac.
  • When was the website last updated?  This could be a problem if you are looking for the latest information and the web site was last updated in 1999.

Types of web sites:

  1. How to site – help with doing your research – Wiki.familysearch.org – great tool for finding how to do research – for many countries
  2. Research done by others and sharing your research
  1. Databases – original images and transcripts – some are free, some are pay to use
  1. Cemeteries and Obituaries
  1. Search engines – learn how to be good at searching
  1. Maps
  1. Directory/Gateway sites – finding FH websites
  1. Archives and Libraries
  1. Surname and locality interest lists
  1. Blogs and Newsletters
  1. Family History or Genealogy Societies – publications and surname interest lists
  1. Scandinavia

 

For a “click and go” version of this handout go to http://pfhn.wordpress.com/ – you can also subscribe to get our new articles automatically by email.

Posted in FamilySearch.org, Getting Started, labs.familysearch.org, Maps and Gazetteers, Research, Wiki at FamilySearch.org | Leave a comment

Are You Missing Most of the Available Genealogy Information?

As you know I am a regular reader of Dick Eastman’s daily Family History blog http://blog.eogn.com/ .

I don’t usually simply re-post someone else’s article but I feel so strongly about this article that I don’t want to mess with Dick’s words (posted 27 July 2014):

“I recently received a message from a newsletter reader that disturbed me a bit. He wrote, “I have been doing genealogy research for 10-15 years but only through the Internet.” He then went on to describe some of the frustrations he has encountered trying to find information. In short, he was disappointed at how little information he has found online.

I read the entire message, but my eyes kept jumping back to the words in his first sentence: “… but only through the Internet.”

Doesn’t he realize that 95% of the information of interest to genealogists is not yet available on the Internet?

To be sure, many of the biggest and most valuable resources are now available online, including national census records, the Social Security Death Index, many military pension applications, draft cards, many passenger lists, land patent databases, and more.

The national databases were the “low hanging fruit” a few years ago as the providers of online information rushed to place large genealogy databases online. These huge collections benefited a lot of genealogists; these databases were the first to become indexed, digitized, and placed online. We all should be thankful that these databases are available today and are in common use.

As the national databases became available to all, the online providers moved on to digitize regional and statewide information. State censuses, birth records, marriage records, death records, naturalization records (which originally were recorded in many local and state courts), county histories, and much, much more are still being placed online.

Of course, this is great news for genealogists who cannot easily travel to the locations where the original records are kept. For many of us, this is even better than having information on microfilm. Most of us don’t have microfilm readers at home, but we do have computers.

Yet, I am guessing that 95% of the information of interest to genealogists has not yet been digitized. Why would anyone want to look for genealogy information “… only through the Internet?”

State censuses, birth records, marriage records, death records, naturalization records, county histories, and more are all “work in progress” projects. That is, they are not yet complete. In fact, I doubt if all of them will be available online for at least another decade or two! If you only look online, you are missing a lot.

In many cases, church parish records, local tax lists, school records, land records (other than Federal land grants), and many more records are not yet available online and probably won’t be available for years. If you are limiting yourself to “… only through the Internet,” you are missing 95% of the available information.

If you have the luxury of living near the places where your ancestors lived, I’d suggest you jump in an automobile and drive to the repositories where those records are kept. There is nothing that matches the feeling of holding original records in your hand. Make photocopies or scan them or take pictures of them or do whatever is possible to collect images of the original records.

If you do not enjoy the luxury of short distances, use microfilm. Luckily, that is easy to do although you will have to leave your home. Many (but not all) of these records have been microfilmed, and those films may be viewed at various libraries, archives, or at a local Family History Center near you. There are more than 4,600 of those local centers, so you probably can find one within a short distance of your home. The Family History Centers are free to use although you do have to pay a modest fee for postage when you rent a microfilm by mail. Seehttps://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Introduction_to_LDS_Family_History_Centers for details. You can also find your nearest Family History Center by starting at:https://familysearch.org/locations.

If you do not know where to start, I would suggest reading “Begin your genealogy quest” athttps://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Begin_your_genealogy_quest for some great “getting started” information.

Which option would you prefer: accessing 5% of the available records or 100% of the available records?”

You can see the full article at http://blog.eogn.com/2014/07/27/are-you-missing-most-of-the-available-genealogy-information/

Subscribing to his blog is a great thing to do.

Thank you Dick!

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More Family History Help for World War One

This week we have seen many articles about World War One as the 100th anniversary of the start of the war is remembered.

When visiting France it is very moving to visit any of the many war cemeteries.  Several articles have involved Canadians.  Mons was liberated by Canadian troops and is the only place where German and British Empire troops share a cemetery.

Trivia question:  who was the last British Empire soldier to be killed in the war?  Answer: George Price, a Canadian, who was born in Nova Scotia, and conscripted while living in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan.  He was shot by a sniper just 2 minutes before the armistice ceasefire took effect at 11 a.m. on 11 November 1918.

Our last article published on 27 July was also about World War One – http://pfhn.wordpress.com/ – and included reference to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.  Our ancestors, however, may have fought on either side in the Great War.  Can you find information about German war graves?  Go to the wiki at FamilySearch.org (under the menu Search) – search for Germany – then select Military.  You will find interesting information!  This includes http://www.volksbund.de/  .  If you are using Google Chrome you should be given the option to get the German translated!   There is also a British flag in the upper right that translates the front page.  In the upper right is a link “Grabersuche Online”  that will take you to a page to search for tombs of your German Ancestors.  This database includes both World Wars One and Two.  We hope this helps you find information about your German ancestors.

This Great War was a tragedy for so many families.

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Remembering World War 1 – and the impact on your family history.

World War 1 – also known as the Great War and  “the war to end all wars” – began in 1914 – One hundred years ago. The assassination of Archduke Ferdinand took place on 28 June 1914 – diplomatic maneuvering failed to prevent the war.  While the first shots were fired on 28 July 1914, Britain did not officially declare war until 4 August  when Germany invaded neutral Belgium.  This year is the centenary!

This tragic and brutal war lasted 4 years and over 9 million combatants were killed – no body knows the exact number.  This had a dramatic impact on society, culture, families, villages, towns, and cities. World War 1 had a great impact on Canada.

My father told me story of a bombing raid by a Zeppelins airship in Nottingham, England – as a small boy I thought he was just making it all up – he had quite a sense of humor! .

 “The glow from Nottingham’s blast furnace chimneys made the city an easy target for Kaptinleutnant Herman Kraushaar, commanding L17, when he raided between 12.00 and 1.00 am on 24 September 1916. Eight high explosive and eleven incendiaries were dropped on what Kraushaar thought was Sheffield, killing three and injuring seventeen. The Midland Railway freight station was wrecked and damaged caused to the Great Central Railway Station and railway track. Bombs also affected Lister Gate, Greyfriar Gate and Broad Marsh. Little resistance was offered to the attack: a blanket of mist rising from the Trent obscured the German airship from below, whilst one of its bombs by fluke severed the telephone wires connecting the AA battery and searchlights at Sneinton, preventing their cooperation.” Thomas Fegan “The Baby Killers – German Air Raids on Britain in the First World War” (Pen & Sword 2002).  My father was living just down the road from the Midland Railway station near to Broad Marsh! I wish I had asked him more about it

Which of your ancestors were involved in World War 1?  Were any of them casualties?  What did your ancestors do during the war?  Where did they serve? Do you have family stories from this time? 

My great grandfather’s first wife had died in 1890 leaving him with 2 young boys – they had only married in 1881.  He remarried by the end of 1890 and his second wife – whose knee I remember sitting on as a small boy – had one son, Charlie.  He went to war and died in northern Greece after surviving the horrors of the Dardanelles campaign.  She lost her only son!  He died on her birthday!

Where can we learn about our Ancestors and World War 1?  My starting place was the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) – http://www.cwgc.org/   Here you can put in the name of someone you think may have died – and be surprised at what you find.  

I always imagined Uncle Charlie dying in Flanders Field in a trench . . . .  What a surprise to find his grave in Greece!  I even get to see a picture of the cemetery! Advanced search will let you specify if you want to search World War 1 or 2 , search by country of origin and military service number.  Remember to be careful how you search – was he Charlie Darker, or Charles or just C?  I found him by searching with just his last name – wouldn’t do that if he was a Smith! You can even download a nice certificate.

Screen Shot 2014-07-19 at 4.21.07 PM

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) has a special website to help us learn about World War 1 http://www.cwgc.org/discover1418

Several countries including Canada have military records online – use the wiki at FamilySearch.org to find my information.  For Canada go to http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/military-heritage/first-world-war/first-world-war-1914-1918-cef/Pages/canadian-expeditionary-force.aspx   Both Ancestry.com and FindMyPast.co.uk have extensive collections of military records to search.  The Memories section at FamilySearch.org is an excellent place to record stories and preserve pictures.

Find out about your ancestors and how World War 1 impacted their lives – record and preserve their stories and pictures.

Did you know that there are war graves in Red Deer? – and that the CWGC still pays money each year for their upkeep.

Did you know that Winnie the Pooh had his origins in World War 1.  Winnipeg the bear – Winnie for short – was the mascot for Canadian Soldiers who gave him to London Zoo when they were sent to France.  A A Milne and his son Christopher Robin went to the zoo, saw Winnie, and was inspired to write a series of stories about him.

There are lots of other interesting animal stories from World War 1 – Jimmy the donkey was born during the Battle of the Somme in 1916, was wounded 3 times during the war, learnt to raise his hoof in salute, and survived the war – glow worms were collected and used as lanterns in the trenches!

Other websites of interest:

National Archives in the UK http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/first-world-war/

The Imperial War Museum in partnership with FindMyPast are gathering and publishing stories of the lives from World War 1 https://livesofthefirstworldwar.org/

The British Broadcasting Corporation has a special World War 1 website http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/0/ww1/

Canadian War Museum http://www.warmuseum.ca/cwm/exhibitions/guerre/home-e.aspx

and many many more . . . .

Posted in Ancestry.com, FamilySearch.org, FindMyPast, Military, Personal Histories, Wiki at FamilySearch.org | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Join the Worldwide Indexing Event

Join volunteers from around the world on July 20 and 21 for an international history-making event! The goal? For 50,000 indexers and arbitrators to submit at least one batch in a 24-hour period! Do more if you would like, but one batch is all that is required to be counted in the record.

Note the times – Starts 6 p.m. MDT (Mountain Daylight Time) on July 20 and ends 5.59 p.m. MDT on July 21 – so 24 hours!

Here is the full details from the FamilySearch blog  https://familysearch.org/blog/en/join-worldwide-indexing-event/

“On July 2, 2012, a total of 49,025 FamilySearch indexers and arbitrators joined together to set the all-time record for the most indexing participants in a single day. That lofty record is about to be broken—by you!

Join volunteers from around the world on July 20 and 21 for an international history-making event! The goal? For 50,000 indexers and arbitrators to submit at least one batch in a 24-hour period! Do more if you would like, but one batch is all that is required to be counted in the record!

This remarkable goal will require help from every current indexer and arbitrator out there, plus many new volunteers,*but it can be achieved if generous volunteers like you commit to participate. So mark your calendar and spread the word! Invite friends and family to join you. Organize an indexing party; create a fun family challenge or a society or church service project. Everyone is needed. Everyone can make a difference!

No matter where you live or what language you speak, you can participate and add to this historic worldwide achievement. You may choose to work on any project you prefer. However, we suggest that you work on the following projects in your native language:

  • US—Obituaries, 1980–2014
  • US—Passport Applications, 1795-1925
  • US, New Orleans—Passenger Lists, 1820-1902
  • UK, Manchester—Parish Registers, 1787-1999

The record-setting begins at 00:00 coordinated universal time (UTC) on July 21, which is 6:00 p.m. mountain daylight time (MDT or Utah time) on Sunday, July 20. It ends 24 hours later, at 23:59 UTC (or 5:59 p.m. MDT) on Monday, July 21. Check the FamilySearch Facebook event page for your local start time and status updates.

Through the selfless efforts of worldwide volunteers like you, millions of people have found their ancestors. At the end of this exciting 24-hour event, millions more records will be available and ancestors will be found!

One batch is all it takes. Don’t miss your chance on July 20 and 21 to be part of this history-making event! Plan now to get involved and add your name to the record-setting legacy!

*New indexers can visit https://familysearch.org/indexing/ to learn more about how to join the FamilySearch indexing effort.”

 

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FamilySearch Now Has One Billion Digital Images Online in the Historical Record Collection

On 23 June 2014 FamilySearch announced :” the online publication of its one billionth image of historic records at FamilySearch.org, a feat that took just 7 years to accomplish. If you don’t have the time or means to travel where your ancestors walked, perhaps you can begin unveiling their fascinating lives through the tidal waves of new online historic records that can recount the stories of their lives. “

Some interesting facts:

“FamilySearch started preserving and providing access to the world’s historical records for genealogy purposes in 1938 using microfilm and distributing copies of the film through its global network of 4,600 local FamilySearch centers. In 2007, it made the shift to digital preservation and access technology and began publishing its massive historic records collections online.

It took 58 years to publish the first two billion images of historic records on microfilm—which was limited to patrons of its local FamilySearch centers and affiliate public libraries. In the past 7 years, it has been able to publish one billion images at FamilySearch.org, which expands access to anyone, anywhere, with Internet access. DeGiulio projects the next billion images should take about 3 to 5 years to publish.

70% of the online images currently come from FamilySearch’s initiative to digitally convert its huge microfilm collection for online access. 25% comes from new camera operations—275 camera teams digitally imaging new historic records in 45 countries that have never seen the light of day or the Internet. And 5% come from agreements with partnering organizations.

Currently, FamilySearch publishes about 200 million images of historic records online each year (averaging about 500,000 per day) making the vast majority of them accessible for the first time to more people from anywhere in the world.”

For the full article go to

https://familysearch.org/blog/en/billion-images-ancestral-historic-records-rebirthed-online/

 

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