The Phillimore Atlas and Index of Parish Registers has been digitized and is available at Ancestry.com!

Better a day late???

Wow!  Just announced in the Ancestry blog http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/06/20/historic-victorian-atlas-published-online/ This is great news for anyone doing research in  Great Britain – that is England, Scotland or Wales!  Never available before in digital format that I am aware – this along with the Imperial Gazetteer of 1872 are foundation research tools.  The Imperial Gazetteer is also available at Ancestry.com and elsewhere on the internet.

Here is the description of the Phillimore Atlas:

“Parish registers are a vital resource for the period prior to civil registration, which began in England and Wales in 1837. When looking for registers, it’s important to know what the parish boundaries were at a specific point in time because many parish boundaries have changed over the centuries. For example, beginning in the 1830s many of the larger old, or “ancient,” parishes began being split up into smaller parishes.

The Phillimore Atlas outlines old parishes prior to 1832 and provides the date of the earliest surviving registers for the parish. The atlas includes England, Wales, and Scotland.

Some counties included hundreds of parishes, so knowing a parish’s location is a huge help when you’re trying to locate your ancestor’s parish records. In addition, your ancestor may have left records in several nearby parishes, all while living in the same area. The Phillimore Atlas provides an easy way to see what parishes were in the area prior to 1832 so you can do a thorough search.

The maps we have available do not have the grid printed along the sides. All maps have a grid range from A1 to M10, with the letters falling along the longest side.”

This is one of my treasured books!  – but the digital online version looks even easier to read!

How do you find this on the Ancestry web site?  Go to the menu Search and select Card Catalog – and then on the next screen Sort by Date Added

Don’t have an Ancestry membership?  Head to your local Family History Centre

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